Composer Aaron Perrine

Tear’s of St. Lawrence is a highlight of our fall 2017 program.  This composition by emerging composer Aaron Perrine, captures the optimistic joy and wonder to be had on a starry night.

11334161_10153309955637348_5629667967767889514_o

Tear’s of St. Lawrence was commissioned by the McFarland High School 9th Grade Concert Band, McFarland, Wisconsin (Joseph Hartson, Director).  Composer Aaron Perrine’s thoughts on this remarkable piece:

 

Early last summer, my then five-year-old daughter became very interested in astronomy. She read every book in the library on the topic and became obsessed with the idea of seeing a falling star. After scanning the night sky for a few months with no success, she began to give up hope. Fortunately for all of us, the annual Perseids meteor shower—often referred to as the “Tears of St. Lawrence”—was quickly approaching. One clear mid-August night, I woke my daughter a bit after midnight. Without telling her what was to come, we quietly made our way outside. After anxiously waiting for what felt like forever, we saw our first falling star together! In addition to the obvious sense of excitement, however, I couldn’t help but feel a bit nostalgic, because I knew that in a few short weeks, my daughter would be going to school for the first time. As we watched the stars, we took turns telling stories as we wondered what the next year would bring. Two hours and countless meteors later, I finally convinced my daughter to return to bed. Tears of St. Lawrence was inspired by the variety of emotions experienced during that memorable night.

 

Perrine-headshot

 Aaron Perrine, a two-time winner of the American Bandmasters Association Sousa/Ostwald Award for his compositions Only Light in 2015 and Pale Blue on Deep in 2013, has received degrees from the University of Iowa, the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota, Morris and is currently on the faculty at Cornell College. A finalist in the first Frank Ticheli Composition Contest, he was included in the series, Teaching Music through Performance in Band ans his music for band has also been featured at The Midwest Clinic, The Western International Band Clinic, and at numerous all-state, state conference and honor band concerts.

We contacted Mr. Perrine and asked him to share with us his thoughts on his journey in music, his musical influences and inspirations and words of advice that he has for young musicians.

Please tell us a bit about your journey in music and in lifeI grew up in a musical family. My grandfather and father were both high school band directors, so music was always around the house when I was a kid. While I always had an interest in writing music, I didn’t really begin to “compose” until the beginning of my sophomore year in college. I entered college as a trumpet major, but at some point during my freshman year, my embouchure changed and I was forced to switch to the trombone. Feeling inadequate for a time on both instruments, my jazz band director asked me to write a chart for our jazz ensemble. While this piece no long exists—aside from the one paper copy I recently removed from my undergraduate institution’s library!—I learned so much about composing from this experience, and was very fortunate to have a director that was so willing to encourage and foster my compositional interests.

I taught high school band for five years in the Twin Cities area and eventually found my way back to graduate school and earned a Ph.D. in composition from the University of Iowa. I currently live in northern Minnesota and spend much of my time composing, but also continue to teach part-time at Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa.

What have been some of your musical influences? A few composers that come to mind (in no particular order) are Michael Colgrass, John Luther Adams, David Maslanka, Maria Schneider, György Ligeti, Igor Stravinsky and Johannes Brahms.

Please share a bit about your favorite musical memory? I don’t know that I could say that I have a favorite as there have been so many, but one that is quite memorable is the premiere of a work of mine entitled, “Only Light,” which was commissioned by Mark Heidel and the University of Iowa Symphony Band. It’s a very meaningful work to me, and I don’t think I took a breath during the eight or so minutes it took them to perform the piece!

Which composer/musician – past or present – would you most like to meet for a coffee and why?  John Lennon. The Beatles were my favorite band when I was young, and I think the way in which they impacted music and society was remarkable.

What inspires you?  Nature, poetry, art, live music

What do you do to relax?  Spend time with my family, golf, hike…

Do you have any advice for young musicians? Enjoy the process and joy of making music! It can be incredibly easy to get caught up in the technical aspects of performing, and while these are definitely important, don’t forget the reason you were drawn to music in the first place.

Please share any thoughts that you may have about the Northshore Concert Band.  The NCB is one of the finest groups of its kind. Thank you for the many years of excellence; you inspire me!

 

A special thank you to Mr. Perrine for speaking with us and giving permission to reproduce this material.  Please visit his website at www.aaronperrine.com to learn more about this notable American composer.


 

Star Wars: A New Hope

Sunday, November 5, 2017, 3:00 pm

Pick-Staiger Concert Hall, Northwestern University, 50 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston, Illinois

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at http://www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews.

Advertisements

Musicians & Music

Meet the extraordinary men and women of Northshore Concert Band who have dedicated their lives to making music!

KELLEY GOSSLER

Kelley Gossler

Kelley Gossler plays the Clarinet and has been with the Northshore Concert Band since 2011. She is a music teacher and lives in Chicago.

When and why did you start playing?  I started playing in 5th grade because almost everyone joined band!

What do you enjoy most about playing?  It’s fun, I love working towards a bigger goal and hearing everything come together.

Do you have a favorite musical memory? Too many to choose from!!!!

Who was your most influential music teacher?  It’s difficult to choose just one teacher! My first greatest influence was my high school band director, Mr. Bixby. He made music incredibly fun and pushed our band to play at a very high level which was very satisfying. Another incredible influence has been Dr. Thompson! She was my mentor during my graduate degree at Northwestern and has proven to be an incredible teacher and role model.

Do you have any advice for young musicians? Learning an instrument takes a lot of work! Keep on trying, ask for help, listen to great performers, and never give up! And of course, make sure you’re always having fun and enjoying what you’re doing.

What makes performing with Northshore Concert Band different than performing with other groups?  My two favorite things about Northshore Concert Band is our commitment to excellence and the wonderful camaraderie within the band.  

List three words to describe the Northshore Concert Band  Friends, music, challenge

 

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at http://www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews of Northshore Concert Band members in this Musicians & Music series!

 

Musicians & Music

Meet the extraordinary men and women of Northshore Concert Band who have dedicated their lives to making music!

MOLLIE MCDOUGALL

Mollie McDougall2

Mollie McDougall plays the French Horn and has been with the Northshore Concert Band since 2005. She is a Band and Orchestra Director and lives in Evanston, Illinois.

When and why did you start playing? Syracuse, NY – my grandmother used to play piano and everyone would stand around and sing – I wanted in on the action and started playing piano when I was 6 and horn when I was 10.

What do you enjoy most about playing? I love making music with others and finding what the greater group can create together. I love my friends in the band that support me and l love learning from them and passing on what I learn to my students.

Do you have a favorite musical memoryPlaying chamber music at Sarasota Chamber Music Festival with musicians from all over the world.

What are your musical influences? Gail Williams, Greg Miller

Who was your most influential music teacher? My high school band director, Andrew Perry

Does anyone in your family play music? My sister is a singer and violinist, my grandmother was a pianist and a great music appreciator.

What’s on your iPod? EVERYTHING – U2, Jazz, Rachimoninoff, Mahler, Bach, Beatles, Death Cab for Cutie, middle school band music….

Do you have any advice for young musicians? Stick with it! It gets more and more rewarding and fun!

What makes performing with Northshore Concert Band different than performing with other groups? Amazing leadership, musicianship and friendship

List three words to describe the Northshore Concert Band. Inspiring, motivating, engaging

Please add anything else that you would like our readers to know about you.  I teach middle school band and orchestra in Highland Park and have twin 3 year olds and a golden doodle.

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at http://www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews of Northshore Concert Band members in this Musicians & Music series!

Musicians & Music

Meet the extraordinary men and women of Northshore Concert Band who have dedicated their lives to making music!

JASON BEAUMONT

jason-beaumont

Jason Beaumont plays the French Horn and has been with the Northshore Concert Band since 2014. He is a Filmmaker/Video Producer and lives in Chicago, Illinois.

When and why did you start playing? I started playing horn in high school when the marching band didn’t have enough horns and too many saxophones, which is the instrument I started on.

What do you enjoy most about playing? I love being a part of an ensemble and kind of syncing up, so to speak, with others in a way that only music provides.

Do you have a favorite musical memoryIn college, I got to play in a pit orchestra for The Secret Garden and I was the only student playing with the faculty brass. I felt like a big shot.

What are your musical influences? Aside from the big composers of the last few centuries, I have always felt a huge connection with the great movie scores of John Williams and James Horner. And as a filmmaker now, that would explain why I’m always trying to shoehorn (pun very much intended) my horn playing into the indie films I’m shooting.

Who was your most influential music teacher? My high school band director, Ron Curtis. He was so supportive, gave great life advice, and someone I considered a great friend.

Does anyone in your family play music? My sister played flute in high school, but I think I’m the only one who regularly leaves the house in a tux.

What’s on your iPod? Let’s just say that it’s a weird enough array of music that a thief would probably return it just to see what kind of person I must be.

Do you have any advice for young musicians? Keep at it and it will always bring you joy and a nice stress reliever. You don’t have to go pro to play in very talented groups, as this non-pro horn performance degreed person will tell you. Also, don’t get a performance degree.

What makes performing with Northshore Concert Band different than performing with other groups? The NCB has both a great dedication to high musicianship and education outreach that I don’t see in many groups. It’s inspiring and makes me work hard.

List three words to describe the Northshore Concert Band. Artistic. Prolific. Terrific.

Please add anything else that you would like our readers to know about you.  Remember, it’s not spit that we French horn and other brass players are dumping out all through a concert, its condensate lung water. Big difference.

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at http://www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews of Northshore Concert Band members in this Musicians & Music series!

41 Years of Musical Inspiration!

The 41st Annual Northshore Concert Band Festival of Music, held at the Northwestern University Campus in Evanston, Illinois, is March 17-18, 2017.

dg3

This annual event offers more than 2,000 K-12 music students a unique musical experience by combining developmental performance opportunities with demonstration performances by outstanding local musicians. Over the past 40 years the Festival of Music has touched the lives of more than 100,000 music students.

Highlights of the Festival of Music include Concert Band Clinics, Solo and Ensemble Contest and a Northshore Concert Band concert at Pick-Staiger Concert Hall at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Concert Band Clinics

Full concert bands will have the opportunity to work with highly regarded university directors, all of whom have a great deal of clinic experience, for a 50-minute clinic in a noncompetitive, non rated format. The clinics, which are not open to the public, are informal, with no requirements about the number or types of pieces that must be performed. It’s a unique no-pressure environment for your ensemble to work with and receive valuable feedback from top educators.

1

The Festival of Music offers students a comprehensive musical experience. Public and private school band directors may bring their concert bands for a 50-minute clinic. This year’s outstanding clinicians include: from Northwestern University, Mr. Daniel Farris & from St. Charles North, retired band director, Mr. James Stombres. The noncompetitive, non-rated format of these clinics emphasizes education rather than a grade or score.  Like last year, all band clinics will take place in Pick-Staiger Concert Hall.  This is a great opportunity for all bands, regardless of age, to perform in an outstanding venue.

Solo and Ensemble Contest

Student musicians will perform solos and ensembles for area band directors and musicians from the Northshore Concert Band, receiving both verbal and written feedback following the performance. Adjudication is available for all wind, string, and percussion instruments as well as voice and piano. Recipients of a I or II rating will receive an award medal.

Unlike other area solo and ensemble contests, the Northshore Concert Band Festival of Music is open to all public and private school teachers as well as private instructors, with no membership dues or fees. In addition, while students wait for their rating, they can attend a free Northshore Concert Band performance!

20160319-dsc_2896

Band Concert

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear a free hour-long concert by the 100-piece Northshore Concert Band, internationally recognized as one of the world’s best adult concert bands.

When  students leave the Festival of Music, they’ll have more than a rating. They will have the opportunity to leave as better well-rounded, aware musicians!


Register Today!

The 2017 Festival of Music Instructor Registration deadline is

October 5, 2016!

Slots for band clinics are limited and fill up quickly. Applications are accepted in the order they are received so don’t delay. For the solo and ensemble contest, simply estimate the number of students who may participate. Send no fees now. Payment information and solo and ensemble entry forms will be provided in our November mailing, or will be available in November for download from http://www.northshoreband.org.

We invite public and private school band directors and school and private music instructors  to please complete the online form available here to reserve a space for your students.


What people are saying about the Northshore Concert Band Festival of Music:

“The Northshore Concert Band is an example of perfection in concert band performance. To have these outstanding musicians available to share their expertise and love of music with student musicians in a very positive and encouraging way is an invaluable learning opportunity.”                                                         — Patricia White, Private Teacher, Addison, IL

“The trip to Northwestern University to perform as part of the Northshore Band Festival is one of the most highly anticipated events of the year. The bonding done by students while visiting the city and performing together in Pick- Staiger is invaluable to the program. The band immediately plays with more focus and accuracy after attending a clinic. It is truly one of the most beneficial activities you can do with your band.”                                                                                                               — Michael Ross, Band Director, Appleton West High School Bands, Appleton, WI

“It is a rich and rewarding experience for students to prepare and learn from experts in their fields. Add the inspirational setting of Northwestern University and the students walk away with memories that will last well into the future!”                                                                                                     — Renee DeJager, Band Director, Timothy Christian Schools, Elmhurst, IL

 “The biggest advantage for me to come to the Northshore Band Festival is that it accommodates my group which consists of a multitude of ages—5th graders through seniors in high school. We get a variety of experience, and I don’t have to go to different sites to get the same job done. I get everything done in one day.”                                                                                                                                      — Karen Kurtz, Band Director, Westlake Christian Academy, Grayslake, IL


If you have any questions please contact the Northshore Concert Band Festival of Music manager Kendra Gohr at 1-847-432-2263 ext. 701 or festival@northshoreband.org.

Musicians & Music

Meet the extraordinary men and women of Northshore Concert Band who have dedicated their lives to making music!

LAUREN WHISNANT

lauren whisnant1

 

Lauren Whisnant plays the French Horn and has been with the Northshore Concert Band since 2014. She is a Music Teacher and lives in Glendale Heights, Illinois. Lauren is also the business manager for Northshore Concert Band.

When and why did you start playing? I started band in 7th grade, but I was originally a clarinet and later oboe player. I finally started learning horn after playing mellophone in marching band (we needed more, I couldn’t play oboe in marching band, so I volunteered!). While I still play oboe from time to time, I definitely identify as a horn player. It fits my personality perfectly!

What do you enjoy most about playing? I love the sense of accomplishment that comes from practicing something difficult & finally mastering it. I also love the camaraderie of playing in an ensemble with other people.

Do you have a favorite musical memory?  It’s definitely hard to pick a single memory, but I’d have to say my first Rush concert was definitely memorable. It was incredible – those guys rock!

What are your musical influences? I’m a big classic rock fan, and two of my favorite musicians are Geddy Lee & Neil Peart from Rush. I try to see the Chicago Symphony as much as possible – they keep my ears “fresh”!

Who was your most influential music teacher? Dr. Scott Tobias, currently the Director of Bands at the University of Central Florida. He was the Associate Director of Bands at Appalachian State University when I completed by undergrad degree & taught at a summer camp I attended in high school. After one week of being in his ensemble, I knew I wanted to be a music teacher – he made it look fun! Later on he became & continues to be one of my most influential mentors.

Does anyone in your family play music? Yes, my dad sings & plays electric bass in his church’s praise & worship band.

What’s on your iPod? Right now I have a very weird collection of music from different genres that are at certain tempos to use while running. Everything is between 160 & 176 b.p.m., because those are the paces I’m working on. Everything from rock to movie soundtracks to punk to classical – it’s eclectic, but it works!

Do you have any advice for young musicians? Keep at it, and keep your mind open. My first music career goal was to be a professional oboist that would play for movie soundtracks. Now I’m a high school band director in a place I never thought I would live, and I LOVE it! Life is funny that way!

What makes performing with Northshore Concert Band different than performing with other groups? The level of performance is astounding, and it makes me constantly work to become a better musician. I love coming to rehearsals & being inspired by something that’s either said by Dr. Thompson or when I hear someone play a phrase in a way that was different than how I interpreted it.

List three words to describe the Northshore Concert Band. Passionate, inspiring, awesome!

 

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews of Northshore Concert Band members in this Musicians & Music series!

Bringing the Music to Emily

12716159_10153714854642745_2548403867308221503_o1

One of our missions is to assist in the music education of young people.  We do this through the presentation of concerts, clinics and festivals.  We are frequently invited to perform educational outreach concerts throughout the Chicagoland area.

On February 18th of this year, we performed with the Northbrook Junior High (NBJH) Wind and Percussion Ensembles. This special evening started with an open clinic by Dr. Mallory Thompson with the NBJH Wind Ensemble, followed by joint performances with NBJH Percussion Ensemble & Wind Ensemble, and concluded with a Northshore Concert Band performance for all to enjoy. NBJH Band director Greg Scapillato helped to make this event possible.  He also organized yesterday’s pop-up concert on the front lawn of a recuperating student musician.

Emily Erickson is an 8th grade student at Northbrook Junior High in Northbrook, Illinois.  A member of the band, she has played flute for five years.  The final band concert of the year was on May 12th.  Unfortunately Emily was unable to attend due to an extended hospital stay where she was recovering from a kidney transplant. But thanks to band director Greg Scapillato and the members of the NBJH band, the music was brought to Emily.

Yesterday, approximately 40 members of the Northbrook Junior High Wind Ensemble assembled on the flute player’s lawn and invited her to play with them in an impromptu pop-up concert.  When asked how it felt to play her instrument for the first time since her surgery, Emily said, “It went way better than I thought. I was afraid it might hurt to hold my breath, but it didn’t.”

“I don’t know if we can replace (the spring concert) but we can put something in its place and give her a special memory that she can carry with her as she goes on to high school,” Mr. Scapillato said. “We wanted to bring her back into the fold. There are no benchwarmers in this group. We’re all together, that’s how the music comes alive. I’m glad it all worked out.”

clinic

This special act of kindness demonstrates the compassion and love that can be brought out through the power of music!

Follow this link to view the touching images of this special tribute included in the Northbrook School District 28 District Spotlight.

All of us in the Northshore Concert Band want to wish flutist Emily Erickson a safe and speedy recovery.

12764809_10153714855112745_1879211391864420514_o

Please call 877-432-2263 or email info@northshoreband.org to learn more about our educational outreach initiatives.

 

Musicians & Music

Meet the extraordinary men and women of Northshore Concert Band who have dedicated their lives to making music!

STEVE MOLINE

steve moline

Steve Moline plays the Bassoon and has been with the Northshore Concert Band since 1981. He is a retired Music Teacher and lives in Naperville, Illinois.

When and why did you start playing? I’ve basically started playing since I was in Kindergarten. Not on bassoon! But I’ve loved Music my whole life.

What do you enjoy most about playing?  I love the relationship between instruments, sections, the whole ensemble.

Do you have a favorite musical memory?  When I was young, I would always ask my Mother if you heard my bassoon during the concert. She would always say yes…but I know she really didn’t. But it always made me feel proud.

What are your musical influences? Mozart

Who was your most influential music teacher? My High School Band Director, Henry Pinter. I really loved him.

Does anyone in your family play music? My Mother played clarinet, my Father played piano. (only on the black keys)

What’s on your iPod? I don’t own an iPod. I listen to WDCB and WFMT. (during dinner)

Do you have any advice for young musicians? HAVE FUN!

What makes performing with Northshore Concert Band different from performing with other groups? It’s such a large group. The sound really makes it whole.

List three words to describe the Northshore Concert Band. Dedicated, professional, BEST

Please add anything else that you would like our readers to know about you.  When looking at the Bassoon section, look for the blond-headed guy!

—————————————————-

Learn more about the Northshore Concert Band at www.northshoreband.org

Follow this blog to receive more informative and entertaining interviews of Northshore Concert Band members in this Musicians & Music series!